Strange Shaped Buildings So Bizarre It’s Hard to Believe They Exist

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Photo Credit: Ali Erturk via extendcreative.com

Engineers and architects are becoming increasingly bold with their designs, taking their creativity to levels once though impossible. These strange shaped buildings, like Dancing House in Prague, Czech Republic, pictured above, are some of the most unusual. Dancing House is sometimes referred to as “Drunk House” due to its shape, which at first glance looks like two drunks were walking bolster each other. One of the city’s icons, it was designed by renowned architects Frank Gehry and Vlado Milunic.

The Crooked House, Sopot, Poland

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Photo Credit: travelmint.com

Built in 2004, this irregularly shaped building is part of the Rezydent Shopping Center in Sopot, Poland. When you come across it, you may think your vision has gone mad. It was designed as an homage to children’s book illustrator Jan Marcin Szancer’s works.

Rotating Towers, Dubai, UAE

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Photo Credit: Dynamic Architects via constructionweekonline.com

The world’s first building in motion was designed by Dr. David Fisher. It rotates each floor separately to adjust to the sun, wind, weather and views. You won’t see it the same way twice as its constantly changing its shape.

The Basket Building, Newark, Ohio

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Photo Credit: home-reviews.com

This is the 7-story corporate office that serves as the headquarters for Longaberger Basket Company.

Piano and Violin House, Huainan, China

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Photo Credit: unusualplaces.org

This house in Huainan, China is shaped like a giant glittering grand piano and a violin. The captivating structure was built by architectural students at Hefei University of Technology in 2007. The body of the building, or piano, can be accessed via escalators inside the glass violin.

The Church of Hallgrimur, Reykjavik, Iceland

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Photo Credit: wonderfulengineering.com

This Lutheran parish church is the tallest in Iceland at a height of nearly 250 feet. Designed by Guðjón Samúelsson, it resembles the basalt lava flow of Iceland’s landscape. It was constructed over almost four decades, between 1945 and 1986.