Spectacular European Castles You Can Spend the Night In

Ashford Castle FEature2

Photo Credit: ourlifeinthed

There are very few people that can afford to live in their very own castle, but you can find out what it might be like, by spending the night in one of these spectacular European castles that have been transformed into hotels, looking as if they’ve stepped out of the pages of a fairytale. Ashford Castle in Ireland, pictured above, was originally built in 1228 and sits on a sprawling 350-acre estate overlooking the sparkling blue waters of Lough Carib.

Chateau de Brissac, France

Chateau de Brissac

Photo Credit: Flickriver via phillipe_28

Nestled within the Loire River Valley of France, Chateau de Brissac is the country’s tallest castle, often referred to as “The Giant of the Loire Valley,” with seven stories and 204 rooms.

Swinton Park Castle, England

Swinton Park

Photo Credit: hotelrez.co.uk via pininterest

Swinton Park is set among 200 acres of parkland in Mansham, complete with turrets, long echoing corridors and massive staircases leading up to the massive, individually decorated and designed bedrooms. The earliest part of the castle dates back to the 17th century, extended castellated and furnished during both the Georgian and Victorian eras.

Ackergill Tower, Scotland

ackergill

Photo Credit: celticcastles.com

Set in the heart of the beautiful Scottish highlands at the edge of the sea surrounded by picturesque countryside, Ackergill Tower is known as one of the most exclusive castles in the world.

Pousada de Obidos, Portugal

Pousada de Obidos

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

One of the 7 wonders of Portugal, this castle was built by the Moors in 713, but in 1148 the first king of Portugal, Afonso Henriques, conquered the town and its castle. It went through a number of transformations throughout the centuries, including being remodeled in the late 13th/early 14th century, while the keep was built some 100 years later. By the 20th century, it was in ruin, but the government repaired it, maintaining much of its unique medieval design, and converted it into one of the country’s finest hotels.