This 2,000-Year-Old Paw Print Proves Cats Have Always Had A DGAF Attitude

clay-paw-print-cat-roman-tile-gloucestershire-1

Cats are jerks but that doesn’t mean we don’t love them! Turns out we’ve been loving on cats that don’t give a hoot about our stuff for as long as 2,000-years.

Tearing up leather sofas, shredding blinds, and making their mark in freshly poured concrete, cats have been having a blast destroying our things for centuries and this 2,000-year-old paw print proves it!

The discovery unraveled as an archaeologist from the Gloucester City Museum was studying a Roman roof tile from 100 C.E. when he saw a very clear paw print impression in the tile. The “tegula” tile with preserved cat paw print was found buried underground in Berkeley Street back in 1969.

A spokesman for the Gloucester City Museum said, “When Romans made roof tiles they left the wet clay out to dry in the sun. Animals, and people, sometimes walked across the drying tiles and left their footprints behind. The cat is thought to have snuck across the wet tiles in Gloucester in about AD 100, probably at the annoyance of the tile makers…”

David Rice, curator at the museum, shared with Discovery News that he has seen more cat paw prints on ancient Roman tiles in Britain than anywhere else in the Roman Empire. This can only mean a couple things… either cats in Britain were bigger jerks, or people living in Britain during this time had more cats.

You can see multiple cat paw prints on this Roman roof tile from 100 C.E.

clay-paw-print-cat-roman-tile-gloucestershire-4
Photo Credit: Gloucester City Museum

As of now this tile remains one of the oldest artifacts of cat “vandalism” in all of the U.K.

clay-paw-print-cat-roman-tile-gloucestershire-1Photo Credit: Gloucester City Museum

It’s not the only one… this one was found in Washington State and is believed to have come to the New World by ship many years ago.

clay-paw-print-cat-roman-tile-gloucestershire-5Photo Credit: Fort Vancouver Historical National Historic Site

Cats destroy EVERYTHING… this document dated March 11, 1445 was vandalized by an inky paw print.

clay-paw-print-cat-roman-tile-gloucestershire-3Photo Credit: Emir O. Filipovic

Next Up: Dogs Can Be Dicks Too: Canine Convicts Caught On Camera