This Is What Happens When You Blow Soap Bubbles at -9 Degrees Celsius

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When the weatherman forecasts freezing cold weather up ahead, few people think of blowing bubbles. After all, bubbles are a summer pastime, done in the presence of beaches or swimming pools. Reserved for fair grounds and giddy days in tank tops. But Washington-based photographer, Angela Kelly, heard of the sudden dip to 10 degrees Fahrenheit last winter, and decided it was the perfect day for blowing bubbles.

After mixing together a homemade concoction, including dish soap, karo syrup, and water, Kelly grabbed her 7-year old son and headed outside. It was early in the morning, just before the sun rose up into the sky. Bundled up in jackets and scarves, the two preceded to blow bubbles with their boots sinking into the snow. As their breath created clouds of smoke against the frigid air, the bubbles froze into unbelievable assortments.

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Both mother and son couldn’t believe their eyes; they felt as if they were looking into another world as the frost etched unmatched details across the bubbles. Just like any loyal photographer, Kelly had her camera nearby, ready to capture the frozen bubbles as they floated through the air.

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She wasn’t prepared for how incredible the results would look on film, or in person. Each bubble froze as it hit the air, simultaneously forming gorgeous and mystical designs from the frost on the bubbles. Each delicate frost image unique from the next, these incredible formations landed on nearby surfaces. An ultra fragile snow globe, made by mother nature herself.

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She struggled most to catch photos of the smallest bubbles, which only froze momentarily before cracking and falling to the ground, like glass shredded across the snow. The larger bubbles retained their frozen property longer, allowing Kelly enough time to capture these incredible images more closely.

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Some of the bubbles maintained their frozen form, swaying down to rest onto surrounding surfaces. In a number of photos, frozen bubbles sit like a fragile ornament on a blanket of porcelain snow. The remains of other partially melted ice bubbles liter the ground like cracked eggs, some cut perfectly in half.

Others don’t crack completely, but instead look like deflated orbs.Kelly told KOMO News, “We also noted how they would begin to deflate and implode in on themselves making them look like alien shapes or in some cases shatter completely leaving them to look like a cracked egg.”

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As soon as the sun began to climb up higher into the sky the delighted pair noticed the frozen bubbles were defrosting at a much more rapid pace. Kelly reports, “We noted how they would freeze completely before the sun rose but that once the sun was in view they would defrost along the tops or cease freezing altogether.”

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Kelly’s other well-known works feature a variety of natural landscapes. A common theme with her work is water and all of the details buried within each drop of the liquid substance we need to survive. With every photo that Kelly takes she strives to show people the little things in life that make our world such a remarkable and inspirational place to call home.

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On the Photographer’s official website, Kelly writes, “Sometimes in our quest to appreciate beauty, we take for granted even the simplest treasures that can be found in our own back yard.” This couldn’t be truer in regards to Kelly’s photo shoot titled “Frozen In A Bubble.”

Pairing intelligence and creativity Kelly created a fun activity for her son and her to do together. In those magical moments she also captured proof that beauty exists all around us.

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Photo Credits: Angela Kelly