Famous Western Fairytales Get An Eastern Makeover By Korean Artist

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I grew up as an all American girl, meaning the faces of Disney characters such as Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella were the leading ladies of my dreams. I simply took for granted they ways that they looked, dressed, talked, and acted, after all their mannerisms and appearances were based directly off the only culture I really knew.

But what if Disney characters originated in a different part of the world, say Eastern Asia, what would they look like? Korean artist Na Young Wu has sought to answer that very question with her latest illustration project.

Na Young Wu draws Disney characters both new and old reinvented to reflect modern Korean cartoon illustrations, or manhwa. The results are so splendid to look at, and the longer you look the more awesome details you can find. Enjoy!

Alice In Wonderland

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That sure looks like Alice and the rabbit falling down a slightly altered rabbit hole.  I love the detailing Na Young Wu attributes to the falling objects and surrounding walls, adding her cultural touch in such clever ways.

Princess And The Frog

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Na Young Wu, who goes by Obsidian (@00obsidian00) on Twitter, is the artist behind many popular products. Her illustrations are featured in the Japanese mobile game Furyoudou~Gang Road, as well as the Korean production of Age of Storm: Kingdom Under Fire Online.

Beauty And The Beast

The “Beast” gets the biggest makeover of all, he is no longer an unidentifiable beast, but instead he is a beautiful tiger.

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Na Young Wu changes each fairytale to resemble modern Korean cartoon illustrations, known as Manhwa. Manhwa is most popularly used in manga, or Japanese comics. While it has been popular in Japan for a long time, it has been gaining rapid popularity in America over the last few years as well.

Red Riding Hood

While Red Ridding Hood keeps her famous red cape, the wolf is entirely altered.

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Wild Swans

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Despite all of the changes this artist applies to each illustration, you can always identify which fairytale the picture represents. Her talent shines clear as she is able to keep the original feel of the story while simultaneously using her own culture and style to reinvent it.

Frozen

Frozen was the biggest Disney movie release EVER, and considering how big Disney is, that’s saying a lot. Frozen hit incredible sales records and won its share of awards. As as a result, Frozen has been buzzed about endlessly, and some parents have been forced to watch it over 500 times.

All that being said, you just might be frozen tired of hearing about Elsa and her gang, if so here’s a different take on the wondrous tale…

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The Snow Queen

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Little Mermaid

If that’s Ursula smoking from the pipe, and judging by all of the tentacles it most certainly is, she sure is better looking in Na Young Wu’s interpretation of The Little Mermaid. After all, Ursula is usually depicted as a hideous purple woman wearing a black dress two-sizes too small.

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Na Young Wu has successfully combined East and West in her spectacular illustrations, hitting on so many underlying themes you could stare at these pictures all day simply thinking on them.

Snow White

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Who knows, perhaps Na Young Wu’s creative illustrations will spark Disney to recreate some of their famous movies to reflect Korean culture, along with many other cultures from around the world. Now that would be SO cool…hey, a full-grown Disney fan can dream!

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Photo Credits: blog.naver.comTwitter